SIGCSE 2009

The 40th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education
March 4-7, 2009, Chattanooga, TN USA
http://www.cs.arizona.edu/sigcse09

 

 

 

Channel SIGCSE 2009 Video Exhibition

Preliminary Program Summary

The original Video Exhibition call for participation: SIGCSE 2009 Video Webpage.

channelSIGCSE on YouTube

Video

Description

on You Tube:

Fun with Pair Programming

A professionally-developed instructional video for educators to show to their students as an introduction to pair programming. The video describes what pair programming is, the do's and don'ts of effective pairing, and the pros and cons of pair programming.

 

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Keep Growing with the XO

With the recent purchase of 15,000 XO laptops from One Laptop Per Child, Birmingham, Alabama has poised itself for tremendous educational opportunities. Unlike some school reform initiatives, this effort by the mayor requires a level of community involvement and renewed educational understanding that is unparalleled. In this video, we hear from a variety of community stakeholders including the mayor's office, school district, and university partners. The focus is a summer program where students created campaigns to teach their communities about healthcare issues using the Scratch programming language on the laptop.

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Pathways in Computer Science

This video illustrates the diverse pathways that students pursue after receiving Bachelors degrees in computer science or computer engineering by profiling five unique applications of the field.

o        Research scientist in computational biology

o        Graduate student working on technology to improve forest firefighting techniques

o        Neurobotics Faculty Member - making better prosthetic devices for people with disabilities

o        Tactile Graphics Research: students working to make textbook graphics readable to blind students

o        Undergraduate student working in India to connect rural communities through technology

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Power to Change the World

This video shows clips from interviews with nearly a dozen computer science undergraduate and graduate students, alumni, and faculty who explain why they chose computer science as their field of study.

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A Day in the Life

A Day in the Life profiles the lives and careers of three UW CSE Undergraduate alumnae currently working in the software industry.

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Programming the PDP-11

This video follows a professor-student pair on a "visit" to a 1970s-era computer room where a programmer demonstrates programming a PDP-11/10. During the visit the programmer demonstrates toggling a machine language program into the PDP-11 and developing assembly language programs using a paper tape system. Viewer interest is maintained by using a humorous (some would say "corny" is a better term) story line. This video was designed to be used in computer organization courses to demonstrate concepts such as bits, bytes, octal, loaders, and two pass assemblers.

view part 1 on YouTube

(part 2)

(part 3)

(part 4)

Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

"Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is an award-winning film about university and tertiary teaching generally. We follow Susan and Robert in their studies. Susan is a model student using learning activities that deepen her understanding; Robert uses low level activities that only just scrape him a pass. The teaching challenge is to engage Robert to study at a deep level too. The key is "Constructive Alignment", a design for teaching developed by John Biggs, which builds our knowledge of how humans learn into the design of teaching. The learning activities needed to achieve the intended outcomes are embedded in both teaching and assessment. Robert now has the support and incentive to learn like Susan does.

part 1 on YouTube

(part 2)

(part 3)

Let's sing about recursion

This video demonstrates an atypical way to help students to develop "computational thinking." The Recursion Song is a different set of lyrics for the classic children's song "It's Raining, It's Pouring." These lyrics describe recursion, as well as demonstrate recursion as the lyrics are generated with a simple recursive algorithm. Furthermore, the music itself proceeds recursively. I also obtain some qualitative feedback from students about the song, to be posted at www.cs.haverford.edu/songs. This song is one example of my project on "computational singing."

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Exercise: Bumper Turtles. Agents interacting with environment

This video tutorial is one of a series of Project GUTS videos introducing StarLogo TNG and agent-based modeling as a tool for understanding complex systems. The target audience is comprised of middle school students and their teachers who serve as after school Project GUTS club leaders.

part 1 on YouTube

(part 2)

INSPIRED Computing Academies for Middle and High School Students

Join the INSPIRED team at Lamar University as we take you on a ten minute tour of our Summer 2008 academies. We've been working with both high school and middle school students to explain and encourage the field of Computer Science. Using fun hands-on labs in web development, animation software, and programmable robots, we have significantly improved the students' understanding of Computer Science. INSPIRED undergraduate and graduate students design, organize, and teach the academies. INSPIRED (INcreasing Student Participation in REsearch Development) is supported by Lamar University and a Broadening Participation Grant from the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0634288.

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Automatic Animation of Java Programs with Jeliot 3

Jeliot 3 is a freely distributable animation system for Java programs. This video shows how Jeliot 3 automatically animates step-by-step two demonstration programs. The first example animates variable declaration and nested if-else statements. Jeliot 3 informs of the users on the result of the condition evaluation, and users can later visualize the selected branch that is executed. The second example introduces the animation of object oriented features, which are supported by Jeliot. The video shows the steps taken in an object construction. Jeliot 3 animates the constructor call, the object allocation, the variable initialization, the constructor execution and the object reference passing. Jeliot 3 provides the teachers with a reliable visualization of programming concepts that can be used with zero-preparation time.

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CSE 466 Software for Embedded Systems Capstone

Capstone focuses on software issues in the design of embedded systems, emphasizing practical application of development platforms. Goals include:

1.        Understanding basic microcontroller architecture and the motivation for special features that distinguish them from microprocessors.

2.        Understanding interfacing techniques for connecting microcontrollers to a variety of sensors and actuators (digital/analog).

3.        Appreciation power management methods.

4.        Understanding basic communication protocols both wired and wireless.

5.        Facility with a complete set of tools for embedded systems programming and debugging.

6.        Experience with implementing several embedded systems focusing on interaction between multiple devices and between devices and general-purpose computers.

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CSE 477 Technology for Low-Income Regions

Capstone focuses on software issues in the design of embedded systems, emphasizing practical application of development platforms. Goals include:

o       Understanding of basic microcontrollers and their use in embedded system design.

o       Familiarity with basic serial and parallel communication methods.

o       Experience the design and development of a complete product using hardware and software, from design to implementation and debugging.

o       Ability to present design goals and decisions as well as implementation results
in both verbal presentation and written documentation.

o       Ability to work toward a common goal in a team environment.

 

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My Keyboard From Input to Output

This video demonstrates an atypical way to help students to develop "computational thinking." Input-Output is a song to provide a way to touch on some of the terms and concepts used in the HCI segment of our CS0 course (cs100) at Haverford College. Note that I have a student tune the guitar (and thus know he can play ...), and that students do sing a little at the end - it's also a nice break from lecture, especially for non-majors. More on computational singing at www.cs.haverford.edu/songs.

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Mad Phd Makes Objects

This animation uses the analogy of building houses from blueprints to explain the concepts behind creating objects in Java. The concepts of defining classes, making instances of objects based on class definitions and using reference variables to access those instances are illustrated as Mad Phd and her friends build their houses in the Happy Hills development.

 

 

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Notes from the Coach

Coach gives a tip on the importance of what the client wants against the backdrop of students handing in an operating systems exam ... with their own unique interpretation of what was important.

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Behind the Scenes

Behind the Scenes is the result of a mid-term group project created by Roger Altizer, Jr., Keith Cormier, Chame Dalton, Todd Trotter for Robert Kesslerís CS 5964: Machinima class in the Spring of 2007. It is a humorous romp through the world of Machinima made possible through clever manipulation of the PC game Half-Life 2.

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The Treasure Hunt

These are demonstrations of activities from the Computer Science Unplugged material that communicates what Computer Science is without using computers. We find that once teachers have seen the demonstration, they are more motivated and understand the point a lot better, which is why the videos were produced. An important aspect of this video is that it is available in multiple languages (English, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Swedish and German). This is to make sure we communicate the activities clearly, as they are unusual in any culture! The translations have been designed carefully to communicate to non-specialists

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The Orange Game

These are demonstrations of activities from the Computer Science Unplugged material that communicates what Computer Science is without using computers. We find that once teachers have seen the demonstration, they are more motivated and understand the point a lot better, which is why the videos were produced. An important aspect of this video is that it is available in multiple languages (English, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Swedish and German). This is to make sure we communicate the activities clearly, as they are unusual in any culture! The translations have been designed carefully to communicate to non-specialists

view on YouTube

 

 

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